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51
 
Brownell, Nancy Butts Negus
 
52 Last name: Buchanan
This long-established and distinguished surname, having no less than seventeen Coats or Arms, and with several notable entries in the "Dictionary of National Biography", is of Old Scottish origin, and is a locational name from the district of Buchanan north west of Drymen in Stirlingshire, so called from the Gaelic "buth", house, and "Chanain", of the canon. This placename was first taken as a surname in the 13th Century by the head of a cadet branch of the clan McAuslan, their name being a patronymic form of "Absalon, Absolon", Anglo-French forms of the Hebrew personal name "Avshalam", composed of the elements "av", father, and "shalom", peace. In 1208, Absalon or Absalone, son of Macbethe, witnessed the gift of the Church of Campsie by Alewin, second earl of Lennox, and in 1225, he was granted a charter of the island called Clarines (Clarinch in Loch Lomond, later the gathering place of Clan Buchanan). Alan de Buchanan, witness, was recorded in the Levenax Charters, circa 1270, and Walter de Buchanan, noted in the same charter, had a grant of Auchmar in 1373. Maurice Buchanan acted as treasurer to Princess Margaret, wife of the Dauphin of France (afterwards Louis XI), and George Buchanan (1506 - 1582) was a historian and Latin scholar of European fame. The Coat of Arms most associated with this great family is a gold shield with a black lion rampant within a double tressure flory counterflory gules. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Absalone de Buchkanan, who witnessed Earl Maldowen's charter to Sir Robert Herthford, which was dated circa 1224, in the "Register of the Monastery of Paisley", Renfrewshire, during the reign of King Alexander II of Scotland, 1214 - 1249.
 
Buchanan, Elizabeth Elspit
 
53
 
Cadieu, Marie-Joseph
 
54
 
Charron, Anne
 
55 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Cilek, Wallace Frank
 
56 Last name: Clark
This long-established surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is from a medieval occupational name for a scribe or secretary, or for a member of a minor religious order. The word "clerc", from the Olde English pre 7th Century "cler(e)c", priest, originally denoted a member of a religious order only, but since the clergy of minor orders were allowed to marry and so found families, the surname could become established. It should also be noted that during the Middle Ages virtually the only people who were able to read and write were members of religious orders and it was therefore natural that the term "clark" or "clerk" would come to be used of any literate man, particularly the professional secretary and the scholar. One Richerius Clericus, Hampshire, appears in the Domesday Book of 1086. The surname was first recorded in the early 12th Century (see below), and other early recordings include: Reginald Clerc, noted in the Curia Regis Rolls of Rutland (1205), and John le Clerk, registered in the "Transcripts of Charters relating to the Gilbertine Houses", Lincolnshire (1272). In the modern idiom the surname can be found as Clark, Clarke, Clerk and Clerke. Richard Clarke was noted as a passenger on the "Mayflower" bound for the New World in 1620. Lawrence Clark, together with his wife, Margaret, and son, Thomas, were famine emigrants who sailed from Liverpool aboard the "Shenandoah", bound for New York in March 1846. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Willelm le Clerec, which was dated 1100, in "The Old English Byname Register of Somerset", during the reign of King Henry I, known as "The Lion of Justice", 1100 - 1135.
 
Clark, Jane
 
57
 
Clark, Marietta "Betsy"
 
58 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Coates, Glenn Ray
 
59 Last name: Coleman
This surname is a Scottish variant of Coleman, which has a number of possible origins, the first source being of both Irish and English origin, from the Old Irish personal name "Colman", from "Columban", a compound of the Gaelic elements "colm", a dove and "ban", white, hence a "white dove". This name was adopted by Scandinavians as the Old Norse "Kalman" and was introduced into Cumberland, Westmorland and Yorkshire by Norwegians from Ireland. The second source is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and was given as an occupational name for a burner of charcoal or a gatherer of coal, from the Middle English (1200 - 1500) "coleman", derived from the Old English pre 7th Century "col" (char) coal and "mann", man. This source of the surname is the same as that of the surname Collier. Another possible source is also of English origin, from an occupational name for the servant of a man named "Cole", Middle English a personal name derived from the Old English byname "cola", from "col", (char)coal, used to describe someone of a dark complexion. The modern surname can be found as Coleman, Colman, Coulman, Callum and Cullum. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Hervicus Coleman, which was dated 1166, in the "Red Book".
 
Coleman, Mary L
 
60
 
Conkling, William Seeley
 
61 06 Apr 1583 Francis Cooke was one of the original settlers to the US on the Mayflower in 1620. He helped in drafting of the Plymouth Charter & he is one of the most documented of the Mayflower passengers. He came over with his son John for religious reasons. His wife Hester came over 3 yrs later with their daughters. They had 2 more sons after she arrived in Plymouth (Plimouth). More info can be found by looking at the Francis Cooke Society on the internet or on Wikepedia. I will be adding more of his story later. Some stories state he was a woolcomber while living in Holland but he came from a titled family where they resided in Gidea Hall, Essex, England.

Last name: Cooke
This interesting surname is of Scottish origin, and is derived from the occupational name for a cook, derived from the Latin "cocus"; the name could also have been given to a seller of cooked meats, or a keeper of an eating house. The name development since 1178 (see below) includes the following: John Coquis (circa 1190, Kelso); Radulphus Cocus (1204, Dryburgh); Richard Cook (1274, Dunfermline); William Cuk (1398, Aberdeen); and John Cuke (1402, Edinburgh). The modern surname can be found as Cooke and Cook, and is very common in both Scotland and England. An early settler in America was one Garret Cooke, who set sail from London on the "Primrose" in July 1635, bound for Virginea. Among the recordings in Scottish Church Registers are the marriage of Alexander Cooke and Marjorie Powrie on August 22nd 1680 at St. Maddes, Perth, and the christening of Thomas, son of John Cooke and Margrat Croone, on February 1st 1715, also at Perth. The marriage was recorded in Glasgow, Lanarkshire, of John Cooke and Elisabeth Barton Watt, on April 28th 1806. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Jocelin Cocus, which was dated 1178, Edinburgh, Scotland, during the reign of King William "The Lion" of Scotland, 1165 - 1214.
 
Cooke, Francis
 
62 Came over on the Mayflower 1620. One of original signers of the Plimouth Compact. Cooke, Francis
 
63 Came over with father Francis Cooke on the Mayflower 1620. Was influenced by the Anabaptists & kicked out of Plymouth and the Congregationalists. Was first white man in Dartmouth, MA area. Became a Baptist minister in Dartmouth. He was the last surving member of the original Mayflower Pilgrims.
Came over with father Francis Cooke on the Mayflower 1620. Was influenced by the Anabaptists & kicked out of Plymouth and the Congregationalists. Was first white man in Dartmouth, MA area. Became a Baptist minister in Dartmouth.

Came over with father Francis Cooke on the Mayflower 1620. Was influenced by the Anabaptists & kicked out of Plymouth and the Congregationalists. Was first white man in Dartmouth, MA area. Became a Baptist minister in Dartmouth. He was the last surving member of the original Mayflower Pilgrims. 
Cooke, John
 
64 John Cooke came over with his father on the ship "Mayflower". He has been fairly well documented. He was actually kicked out of the Plymouth Plantation for being too worldly & outspoken in reguards to religion & was not considered an upstanding citizen. He left & went to the Dartmouth, MA area. He was not the founder of Dartmouth but was one of the first white men in that area. After settling there he brought his wife Sarah & their children to live there. He eventually became an Ana-Baptist minister & was considered by the people there as being a godly & upstanding citizen-a plaque is located in Dartmouth honoring him. It just goes to show how different perspective people can have.
 
Cooke, John
 
65 Attended & an alumni of Oxford University. Cooke, John Sir
 
66 Graduated from Oxford Univ in England. Possibly he is the one who built Gidea Hall.. Cooke, John Sir
 
67 Some genealogists show him as Lord Mayor of London but he does not show up on the official list of all the Lord Mayor's. His son Thomas was Lord Mayor of London & shows up on the official list. Cooke, Robert Sir
 
68 Daughter of John Cooke & Sarah Warren Cooke. Sister of Mary Cooke. Cooke, Sarah
 
69 It was customary for Lord Mayors to be created Knights upon taking office & given the title of Baronet when they retired unless they already held those titles. The residence of the Lord Mayor is Mansion House. He was Lord Mayor during 1462. Cooke, Thomas Sir Lord Mayor of London
 
70 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Copeland, Sarah "Sady"
 
71 Published, verified, & documented genealogy of Charlotte, her sis Anne, & their noble & royal family line. Also info located on Wikipedia. Couvent, Charlotte
 
72 Last name: Cowan
This name, widespread in Scotland and Ulster, is an Anglicized form of the old Gaelic MacEoghain or MacEoin. The Gaelic prefix "mac" means "son of", plus the personal name Eoghan from the old Celtic "Oue(i)n", well-born, but believed to derive ultimately from the Greek "Eugenious", "born lucky" or "well-born". In Ireland Eugene replaced Eoin, the old Irish form of John, and the various patronymic forms of the name include MacOwen, MacCown, MacCone, MacKeown. The forms Cowan, Cowen and Kewon resulted from the subsequent loss of the "Mac" prefix. In 1582 one, John Cowan was Chancellor of Christ church, Waterford, and in 1639 Cowan's Hospital in Stirling was founded by John Cowan, a merchant there. On June 29th 1643 Marionne Cowan and George Mwir were married in Ochiltree, Ayrshire. On May 8th 1846 Pat Cowan, a merchant, aged 21 yrs., embarked from Liverpool on the "Rochester" bound for New York. He was a famine immigrant to that city. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Elizabeth Cowan, (marriage to Edward Humphery), which was dated November 12th 1580, London, during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, known as "Good Queen Bess", 1558 - 1603.
 
Cowen, Elizabeth
 
73 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Culligan, Adelia "Delia"
 
74 She never married nor had any children. She was a teacher.
 
Culligan, Annistatia L
 
75 Last name: Culligan
Recorded in several spellings including O' Culligan, O' Quilligan, Qulligan, Culligan, McColgan, Colgan, and probably others, this is an Isrish surame. It originates from the pre 10th century Gaelic O' Cuilleagain, which means the descendant of Colgan, a name deriving from "coll", meaning a hazel tree. Quilligan, and the other variant spellings are County Clare names, as well as in the city of Limerick part of which lies on the Clare side of the Shannon. In the 19th century Culligan was much more numerous than Quilligan, but more recently they are about equal. It is thought that originally the sept was from County Offaly, migrating westwards in the 16th Century, to West Clare where they were well established by the 17th Century. Cullegane is returned in "Petty's Census" as a principle name in the barony of Clonderlaw. One Ellen Quilligan married William Henry Lincoln on August 27th 1822 at St. James, Paddington, London. On April 26th 1847 Mary Quilligan, aged 13 yrs., embarked from Limerick on the ship "Annamaria" bound for New York. She was one of the several thousand famine immigrants to enter the city that year. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Bartholomew Quiligan, (as spelt), witness at the christening of his daughter, Ellen, which was dated August 10th 1794, Roman Catholic Church, Killarney, Co. Kerry, during the reign of King George III, "Farmer George", 1760 - 1820.

Also shows up as Culligane & Calligane in some Co. Clare Census Rolls during the 1700/1800's.

Denis Culligan & Bridget along with 3 of their children immigrated to the US (1849) before the worst of the potatoe famine hit Ireland.
He died before the 1900 Fed Census as Bridget shows up as widowed HOH with son John Dennis & daug Annistacia.
 
Culligan, Denis
 
76 Conflict of husband's name-Family Search.org shows her married to Maurice Flynn on 10 Oct 1869, Milwaukee, WI. but also shows her married to August Rusch on same date. Most likely husband was Maurice Flynn due to fact he was Irish & lived 69 Bay Str. which was same address as sis (Delia) of Elizabeth. She may also be known as Eliza.
 
Culligan, Elizabeth "Lise"
 
77
 
Culligan, James
 
78 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Culligan, John Dennis Jr.
 
79 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Culligan, John Dennis
 
80 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Culligan, Lucy "Lucie" Camilla
 
81
 
Culligan, Margaret Theresa "Maggie"
 
82
 
Culligan, Mary A
 
83 He was a king's lawyer & notary. He also farmed. Arrived in Quebec abt 1653. 6 of his sons were Courers du Bois fur traders & worked for Nicolas Perrot & Bissot de Vinciennes. They were Jean, Michel, Charles, Nicolas, Joseph, & Ange. Many of the daughters married men in the fur trade. Cusson, Jean II dit Caillou
 
84 Maiden name may be Dalgleish. Sis may be Margaret Dalgleish. Shows up on census records with Christopher Wield.
 
Dalgleish, Mary
 
85
 
Dany, Madeleine
 
86
 
De Bluche, Marie-Joseph
 
87
 
Demers, Marguerite Dumay
 
88
 
Desdames, Anne
 
89
 
Desmarais, Julienne
 
90
 
Desnoyers, Jacques Lajuenesse
 
91 She is credited as being the 1st white child born in New France. She is also the god-child of Samuel De Champlain & his wife. In Champlain's will he left Helene the equivalent value today of $15,000 (300 livres). She became a mid-wife & taught some her daughters about mid-wifery.
Info taken from Wikipedia & Canadian records (Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online). Her aunt & uncle were Marguerite Langlois & Abraham Martin (Plains of Abraham fame).
 
Desportes, Helene
 
92 He was in charge of the wharehouse in Quebec & also a baker & one of the men who explored New France with Samuel De Champlain. Employed with Company of 100 Associates (founded by Cardinal Richelieu) which helped with administration of the colony. Desportes, Pierre
 
93 Revolutionary War application SAR # 26477 Vol 133. Devol, David
 
94 Peace Devol's (also spelled Davol) mother was her husband Charles Tripp's aunt.
 
Devol, Peace
 
95 Shows up on official list of Carignan soldiers (Filles du Roi Society). Diel, Charles dit LaPetit Breton
 
96 Last name: Dunn
This surname, found in England, Scotland and Ireland, has a number of possible origins. Firstly, it may be of Anglo-Saxon origin, from the Olde English pre 7th Century and Middle English "dunn", meaning "dull, brown, dark-coloured", and was a nickname for a man with dark hair or a swarthy complexion. It may also have originated from an unrecorded Middle English survival of an Olde English byname, "Dunna", dark. Secondly, the surname is widespread in Ireland, where it is the Anglicized form of the Gaelic "O'Duinn, Doinn", composed of the Gaelic prefix "O", male descendant of, and the personal name "Duinn, oinn", from "donn", black, brown, a byname given to someone with dark hair or swarthy complexion, as above. In Ireland the name is usually spelt "Dunne", and the sept originated in County Leix and formed one of the principal families of Leinster where their chief was the Lord of Iregan; they were especially mentioned in mid 16th Century documents as hostile and dangerous to the English interest. Those who spelt their name Dunn usually came from Ulster, where they were possibly of Scottish extraction. Finally, in Scotland, the surname also derives from this Celtic origin, but may also be locational from the lands of Dun, Tayside (Angus), which derives from "dun", fort. Early recordings include William Dun (1180, Gloucestershire), John le Dun (1198, Hertfordshire), and Adam de Dun (1255, Scotland). A Coat of Arms granted to a Dunn Family in Bircher, near Leominster, depicts quarterly first and second silver, a gold wolf salient, second and third, black three round gold buckles, tongues downward. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Gillananaomh O'Duinn, which was dated 1102, in the "Ancient Irish Records", during the reign of Irish High Kings in Opposition, 1103 - 1169.
 
Dunn, Michael J
 
97 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Eagleton, Hazelle
 
98 Last name: Edward
This is an Old English personal name, from "Eadward", meaning "prosperity Guard" from the elements "ead" for prosperity, fortune and "W(e)ard" guard. The name spread from England to the continent, probably influenced by the fame of the two canonized kings of England, Edward the Martyr (962 - 979) and Edward the Confessor (1004 - 1066), and of course this factor was contributory to the popularity of the name in England. It was first recorded in the Anglo Saxon Chronicle as "Eadweard" circu 800 AD. "Edwards" (plural) means either "son of Edward or sometimes Servant of Edward". The first recording of Edward as a surname is William Edward, 1219, in the Suffolk Pipe Rolls. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Edunardus. which was dated 1086, in the Domesday Book, London. during the reign of King William I, known as "The Conqueror", 1066 - 1087.
 
Edward, Dorothy
 
99 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Ellrick, Margaret
 
100 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Evans, Claudia K Foster
 

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