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   Notes   Linked to 
151
 
Garnier, Genevieve Jacqueline
 
152
 
Garnier, Guillaume Sieur de Bois Fontaine
 
153
 
Garnier, Isaac Joseph
 
154
 
Garnier, Jeanne
 
155
 
Garnier, Joseph
 
156
 
Garnier, Joseph
 
157 Marne, France Births, 1501-1907 show a Louise Garnier born 17 Jan 1636 in Chalons-en-Champagne, Saint-Jean, France with residence in same place. Parents are Jacques Garnier & Marie De Saint-Martin. Most people have her as child of Charles Garnier & Jeanne Labraye. Record saved to Ignored Hints on ancestry.com for Louise Garnier. She also was supposed to have 3 brothers.
 
Garnier, Louise
 
158
 
Garnier, Louise Angelique
 
159
 
Garnier, Marie Francoise
 
160
 
Garnier, Marie Marguerite
 
161
 
Gaudry, Marie Francoise
 
162
 
Gaudry, Nicolas Dit La Bourbonniere
 
163
 
Gauthier, Denise
 
164
 
Gaye, Louise
 
165
 
Germain, Therese Magny
 
166
 
Gervais, Agnes
 
167 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Gervais, Arthur
 
168
 
Gervais, Benoni
 
169
 
Gervais, Clemence
 
170 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Gervais, Delia F
 
171 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Gervais, Gustave
 
172
 
Gervais, Jean Baptiste
 
173
 
Gervais, Joseph
 
174
 
Gervais, Noe
 
175
 
Gervais, Pierre
 
176 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Gervais, Teresa
 
177
 
Gervais, Victoria
 
178 Last name: Gery
Recorded in a number of spelling forms including: Geary, Gery, Gerry, Jeary, Jery, Jerry, Jaray, and Jarry, this interesting surname has three possible meanings and two possible origins, English and Irish! Taking the English origin. This is a derivation of the pre 7th century Anglo-Saxon and Olde German word Geri or Gari, translating as "spear". This may have described a soldier who carried such a weapon, or it may simply by a personal name at a time when any name which extolled war and weaponry was greatly treasured. The surname from this source is first recorded towards the end of the 12th Century (see below). Another possibility is that the name derives from the Medieval English word "geary" meaning "fickle" and as such was given as a nickname to a capricious person. Three spellings of the name appear in the Hundred Rolls of Huntingdonshire, dated 1273, as Jery, Gery and Geri. The second possible origin is Irish. The surname as Geary is fairly widespread in the Munster counties of Cork and Kerry. Whilst for some nameholders it may be a 17th century import from England, it is usually considered for most nameholders to be a form of the Gaelic O' Gadhra meaning "hound", and said to be the nickname of the first chief of the sept in the 10th century. Amongst the many interesting nameholders was Sir Francis Geary (1710 - 1796). Said to originate from an Irish family, he was the Admiral of the Blue in the British fleet in 1775, and was created a baronet in 1782. The first recorded spelling of the name anywhere in the world may be that of Richard Geri. This was dated 1195, in the "Pipe Rolls" of Oxfordshire, during the reign of King Richard Ist of England, 1189 - 1199.
 
Gery, Elizabeth
 
179 Shows up as owning land in Devon, England 1733. Bartholomew Gidley of Gidley, Devon, Gentleman. Gidley, Bartholomew
 
180 alt. b. 1588 Gidley, George
 
181 Left Dartmouth, MA area due to stigma of marrying a Portugese fisherman. The Portugese in the area were very looked down upon. Gidley, Henrietta A
 
182 There is some confusion as to where John Gidley was born. Info shows his father as being born & dying in England but his son John being born in Massachusetts, USA. Either John was born in England & immigrated to US or his father Oliver immigrated to US & would probably have died in the US instead of England.

Last name: Gidley
This name achieved fame during the period of the English Civil War (1640 - 1651), Bartholomew Gidley of Gidleigh, Devon, rendering a particular service to King Charles II, in the period before his restoration in 1660. This probably refers to the King's escape after the battle of Worcester in 1651, when for three weeks he was hidden in the Devon-Dorset area. The family received as a reward the grant of arms and a silver medallion in 1671. The origination is from the hamlet of Gidleigh deep in the forest on the edge of Dartmoor between Chagford and Okehampton. The place is ancient and even today, mysterious. It was first recorded in 1156 a.d. as 'Gidelia', the translation from the Olde English being 'the place (leah) of the Gydda tribe'. Geddinge in Kent and Gedding in Suffolk have the same meaning. The Gidleys of Gidleigh held large estates in Devon, the spelling of their surname being interchangeable. However in or about 1690 the spelling settled as Gidley. The village was 'enclosed' in the 16th century and many tenants were dispossessed and scattered around the country. These people took (or were given) as their surname, the name of their former village. Examples of the surname recordings include Bartholomew Gidley who married Joane Northleigh at Alphington, Devon, on November 27th 1637, whilst on October 1st 1678, another Batholomew, who himself was the son of Bartholomew (but which one?), was christened at Gidleigh on October 1st 1678. The blazon of the coat of arms of Gidley of Gidleigh has a gold field, charged with a black castle inside a black bordure bezantee. The crest is a gold eagle. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Bartholomew Gydleye, which was dated April 27th 1548, christened at South Tawton, Devon, during the reign of King Edward VI, known as 'The boy king' 1547 - 1554.
 
Gidley, John
 
183 Last name: Gidley
This name achieved fame during the period of the English Civil War (1640 - 1651), Bartholomew Gidley of Gidleigh, Devon, rendering a particular service to King Charles 11, in the period before his restoration in 1660. This probably refers to the King's escape after the battle of Worcester in 1651, when for three weeks he was hidden in the Devon-Dorset area. The family received as a reward the grant of arms and a silver medallion in 1671. The origination is from the hamlet of Gidleigh deep in the forest on the edge of Dartmoor between Chagford and Okehampton. The place is ancient and even today, mysterious. It was first recorded in 1156 a.d. as 'Gidelia', the translation from the Olde English being 'the place (leah) of the Gydda tribe'. Geddinge in Kent and Gedding in Suffolk have the same meaning. The Gidleys of Gidleigh held large estates in Devon, the spelling of their surname being interchangeable. However in or about 1690 the spelling settled as Gidley. The village was 'enclosed' in the 16th century and many tenants were dispossessed and scattered around the country. These people took (or were given) as their surname, the name of their former village. Examples of the surname recordings include Bartholomew Gidley who married Joane Northleigh at Alphington, Devon, on November 27th 1637, whilst on October 1st 1678, another Batholomew, who himself was the son of Bartholomew (but which one?), was christened at Gidleigh on October 1st 1678. The blazon of the coat of arms of Gidley of Gidleigh has a gold field, charged with a black castle inside a black bordure bezantee. The crest is a gold eagle. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Bartholomew Gydleye, which was dated April 27th 1548, christened at South Tawton, Devon, during the reign of King Edward VI, known as 'The boy king' 1547 - 1554.
 
Gidley, Oliver
 
184 Date of birth possibly wrong. Gidley, Richard
 
185 Last name: Gilmour
This interesting surname is of Anglo-Saxon or Scottish and Irish origin, and is an Anglicized form of the Gaelic "MacGille Mhoire" (Scotland), or "MacGiolla Mhuire" (Ireland), a patronymic from the personal names meaning "servant of (the Virgin) Mary". It can also be a locational name from Gillamoor in Northern Yorkshire, so called from the Olde English pre 7th Century personal names "Getlingas" or "Gyolingas", meaning "people of Getta", or "people of Gyola", and "mor", marsh or moor. This surname dates back to the early 13th Century (see below), and further early recordings include, Gillechad Gillamor (1304), who witnessed a grant by Huctred. In the modern idiom the surname can be found recorded as Gillmor(e), Gilmer, Kolmore and Golour. Recordings from London Church Registers include: the christening of Margaret, daughter of Willim and Elner Gilmer, on August 15th 1586, at St. Dunstan's, Stepney, and the christening of Elizabeth, daughter of Johan and Mary Gilmour, on November 29th 1761, at St. Michael's, Bassishaw. Catherine Gilmore, aged 25 yrs., a famine immigrant, sailed from Liverpool aboard the "Montezuma", bound for New York in May 1846. A Coat of Arms granted to a family of the name is on a silver shield a green chevron, between three green trefoils slipped, three hunting horns stringed silver, the Crest being a dexter hand fesseways couped, holding a writing pen proper. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Richard Gilemor, which was dated 1228, witness in the "Feet of Fines of Huntingdonshire", during the reign of King Henry III, known as "The Frenchman", 1216 - 1272.
 
Gilmour, Ann
 
186
 
Goguet, Amable Angelique
 
187
 
Goguet, Anne-Antoinette
 
188
 
Goguet, Anonyme
 
189
 
Goguet, Antoine
 
190
 
Goguet, Barbe
 
191
 
Goguet, Basilisse
 
192
 
Goguet, Catherine
 
193
 
Goguet, Catherine
 
194
 
Goguet, Catherine
 
195
 
Goguet, Charles
 
196
 
Goguet, Claude
 
197
 
Goguet, Elisabeth
 
198
 
Goguet, Etienne
 
199
 
Goguet, Francois dit Sansoucy
 
200
 
Goguet, Francois Xavier
 

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